Art, History and Racism

“I’ve always been fascinated by history: art history, American history, world history, individual history – how history is written, recorded, distorted, exploited, reimagined, and understood.  In my work I explore the materiality of reconstructive history.  I paint and I sculpt, often borrowing from the historical canon, and then alter the work in some way.  I cut, crumple, shroud, shred, stitch, tar, twist, bind, erase, break, tear, and turn the paintings and sculptures I create, reconfiguring them into works that nod to hidden narratives and begin to reveal unspoken truths about the nature of history.  Open areas become active absences, walls enter into the portraits, stretcher bars are exposed, and structures that are typically invisible underneath, behind, or inside the canvas are laid bare, revealing the interiors of the work.  In so doing, my aim is to perform what I critique, to reveal something of what has been lost, and to investigate the power of a rewritten history.”

Titus Kaphar was born in 1976 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He currently lives and works between New York and Connecticut. His artworks interact with the history of art by appropriating its styles and mediums.

11104_825887767483541_6247896407735949551_n

1511091_825887814150203_7281840106546942246_n

10268441_825887790816872_7275033196833430520_n

10615431_825887754150209_1862554959817343377_n

10636313_825887724150212_7622589499829745863_n

10891448_825887757483542_4469355398471929675_n

10941438_825887787483539_9007781233177177021_n

10945776_825887720816879_2163483564730548458_n

10952073_825887734150211_5065390303064758106_n

 

Source: jackshainmangallery